About Mangalore

ABOUT MANGALORE

 

 

HISTORY

history2The History of Mangalore dates back to the Mythological times and is accounted to as part of Parashurama Srishti. Mangalore has been ruled by a number of rulers like the Kadambas and Vira Harihararaya II. It was later conquered by the Portuguese, who lost it to Hyder Ali.Until India’s independence Mangalore remained under the rule of the British who had taken over,by defeating Tippu Sultan.Mangalore which was a part of the Madras Presidency was merged into a unified Mysore State in 1956.European influence in Mangalore can be traced back to 1498, when the Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama landed at St Mary’s Island near Mangalore.In the 16th century, the Portuguese came to acquire substantial commercial interests in Canara. Krishnadevaraya (1509–1529), the then ruler of the Vijaynagara empire maintained friendly relations with the Portuguese. The Portuguese trade was gradually gathering momentum and they were striving to destroy the Arab and Moplah trade along the coast. In 1524, when Vasco da Gama heard that the Muslim merchants of Calicut had agents at Mangalore and Basrur, he ordered the rivers to be blockaded. In 1526, the Portuguese under the viceroyship of Lopo Vaz de Sampaio took possession of Mangalore. The coastal trade passed out of Muslim hands into Portuguese hands.In 1550, the Vijayanagara ruler, Sadashiva Raya, entrusted the work of administering the coastal region of Canara to Sadashiv Nayaka of Keladi. By 1554, he was able to establish political authority over South Canara. The disintegration of the Vijaynagara Empire in 1565 gave the rulers of Keladi greater power in dealing with the coastal Canara region.They continued the Vijayanagara administrative system. The two provinces of Mangalore and Barkur continued to exist. The Governor of Mangalore also acted as the Governor of the Keladi army in his province.In 1695, the town was torched by Arabs in retaliation to Portuguese restrictions on Arab trade.

 

European influence in Mangalore can be traced back to 1498, when the Portuguese explorer Vasco da Gama landed at St Mary’s Island near Mangalore. In the 16th century, the Portuguese came to acquire substantial commercial interests in Canara. Krishnadevaraya (1509–1529), the then ruler of the Vijaynagara empire maintained friendly relations with the Portuguese. The Portuguese trade was gradually gathering momentum and they were striving to destroy the Arab and Moplah trade along the coast. In 1524, when Vasco da Gama heard that the Muslim merchants of Calicut had agents at Mangalore and Basrur, he ordered the rivers to be blockaded. In 1526, the Portuguese under the viceroyship of Lopo Vaz de Sampaio took possession of Mangalore. The coastal trade passed out of Muslim hands into Portuguese hands. In 1550, the Vijayanagara ruler, Sadashiva Raya, entrusted the work of administering the coastal region of Canara to Sadashiv Nayaka of Keladi. By 1554, he was able to establish political authority over South Canara. The disintegration of the Vijaynagara Empire in 1565 gave the rulers of Keladi greater power in dealing with the coastal Canara region. They continued the Vijayanagara administrative system. The two provinces of Mangalore and Barkur continued to exist. The Governor of Mangalore also acted as the Governor of the Keladi army in his province.In 1695, the town was torched by Arabs in retaliation to Portuguese restrictions on Arab trade.

 

 

Mangalore is named after Goddess Mangaladevi. It is said to be the only city in the world to have 8 different names in 8 different languages.

Languages English
Kannada Mangaluru - ಮಂಗಳೂರು (Officially)
English Mangalore - ಮ್ಯಾಂಗ್ಳೂರ್
Tulu Kudla - ಕುಡ್ಲ
Konkani Kodial -ಕೊಡಿಯಾಲ್
Beary Maikala - ಮೈಕಾಲ
Malayalam Mangalapuram - ಮಂಗಳಾಪುರಂ
Havyaka Kodeyaala - ಕೊಡೆಯಾಲ
Sanskrit Manjarun - ಮಂಜಾರನ್

CULTURE

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yakshaMangalore Tulu: Kudla, ಕುಡ್ಲ; Kannada: ಮಂಗಳೂರು, Mangalūru; Konkani: Kodial, ಕೊಡಿಯಾಲ್; Beary: Maikala, ಮೈಕಾಲ) is the chief port city of the Indian state of Karnataka. A resident of Mangalore is known as a Mangalorean in English, Kudladaru in Tulu, Kodyalkar or Mangalorekar in Konkani Language and Manglurnavaru in Kannada, Maikaaltanga in Beary bashe.Yakshagana is a night-long dance and drama performance practised by Tuluvas with great fanfare. Piliyesa is a unique form of folk dance in the region fascinating the young and the old alike, which is performed during Marnemi (as Dussara is called in Tulu) and Krishna Janmashtami. Karadi Vesha (Bear Dance) is one more popular dance performed during Dasara in Mangalore. Bhuta Kola or spirit worship, which is usually done at night is practised by Tuluvas. Kambala or buffalo race is conducted in water filled paddy fields. Korikatta (Cockfight) is another favourite sport for the people. An ancient ritual associated with the ‘daivasthanams’ (temples) in rural areas, Hindu kozhi kettu, a religious and spiritual cockfight, is held at the temples and also allowed if organised as part of religious or cultural events. Nagaradhane or Snake worship is practised in the Tulu Nadu by Tuluvas according to the popular belief of the Naga Devatha to go underground and guard the species on the top.

 

 

FAMOUS FOOD

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Mangalore Culture FoodMangalorean Cuisine(Tulu : ಕುಡ್ಲದ ವನಸ್) is a collective name given to the cuisine of Mangalore which comprises cuisines like Udupi as well as cuisine of the Mangalorean communities like that of the Tuluvas, Rajapur Saraswat Brahmins, Goud Saraswat Brahmins, Mangalorean Catholics and the Bearys. Mangalorean cuisine is largely influenced by the South Indian cuisine, with several cuisines being unique to the diverse communities of the region. Coconut and curry leaves are common ingredients to most Mangalorean curry, as are ginger, garlic and chili. Mangalorean Fish Curry is popular dish in Karnataka. Well-known Tuluva dishes include Neer Dosa, Masala Dosa,”Chicken Ghee Roast”,”Chicken Sukka”,Kori Rotti (dry rice flakes dipped in gravy), Bangude Pulimunchi (spicy sour silver-grey mackerels), Beeja-Manoli Upkari, Neer dosa (lacy rice-crêpes), Boothai Gasi, Kadubu, and Patrode. The Konkani community’s specialities include Daali thoy, bibbe-upkari (cashew based), val val, avnas ambe sasam, Kadgi chakko, paagila podi, and chane gashi. Vegetarian cuisine in Mangalore, also known as Udupi cuisine, is known and liked throughout the state and region. Since Mangalore is a coastal town, fish forms the staple diet of most people.Mangalorean Catholics’ Sanna-Dukra Maas (Sanna – idli fluffed with toddy or yeast; Dukra Maas – Pork), Pork Bafat, Sorpotel and the Mutton Biryani of the Muslims are well-known dishes. Pickles such as happala, sandige and puli munchi are unique to Mangalore. Khali (toddy), a country liquor prepared from coconut flower sap, is popular

 

PLACES TO VISIT

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AloysiusChapelThe city is called the Gateway of Karnataka and lies between the Arabian Sea and the Western Ghats. The various temples and buildings in Mangalore include the Mangaladevi temple, Kadri Manjunatha temple, St Aloysius Chapel, the Rosario Cathedral, Milagres Church, Dargah of Hazrat Shareef ul Madni at Ullal and the Jama Masjid.Interior of the St. Aloysius Chapel.The city is also known for beaches such as Panambur, Tannirbavi, NITK beach, Someshwara, Ullal beach, Summer Sands, Kotekar beach and Sasihithlu beach. Panambur and Thannirbhavi beaches attract tourists from across the country. Panambur beach has many facilities including Jet ski rides, Boating, Dolphin viewing, Food stalls, besides Trained Beach Lifeguards and Patrol vehicles to ensure the safety of the visitors.Saavira Kambada Basadi is situated 34 km (21 mi) northeast of Mangalore in the town of Moodabidri. The Sultan Battery watch tower, built by Tipu Sultan, situated in Boloor is on the banks of Gurupura River where one can take the ferry ride by paying small amount across the river and reach Tannirbhavi Beach. Manasa Amusement & Water Park, Pilikula Theme Park are located at Vamanjoor. Adyar waterfalls is at the outskirts at about 12 km (7.5 mi) from the city. Mangalore Dasara, a ten-day festival at Sri Gokarnatheswara temple attracts devotees from various states of India who visit Mangalore to witness Dasara.Mangaladevi temple is another temple which attracts devotees from all over India during Navaratri.

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